Chronic Lyme Disease – 13 Things That Help Me Feel Better!

This past week was definitely a better week for me than the week before. Yes, my symptoms were still there, but they weren’t as intense. I was actually able to work on a paint job for 5 days. That is a tremendous answer to prayer. No, it was not a pain-free 5 days, but it was better than usual.

So what’s helping me feel better? …

1Diet/Nutrition … I’ve been maintaining a strict/healthy diet and that means less inflammation/pain. I avoid sugar, gluten, and dairy. I’ve also been avoiding fried foods, artificial sweeteners, vegetable oils, beans, and alcohol. I eat as organic as I possibly can. If I eat sugar, it’s less than 12g.

2Sleep … I’ve been consistently going to bed at a decent hour to make sure I’m getting plenty of uninterrupted sleep. Last night I was in bed at 9pm (on a Saturday night). I don’t even care. For me to have uninterrupted sleep, I sometimes have to sleep in the guest bedroom. I hate doing that as a married man, but uninterrupted sleep is absolutely vital to my health and ability to work my job which enable me to make money for my family’s needs and wants.

3Supplements … I’ve been extremely consistent with taking my vitamins, supplements, and meds. I take many of them 2 to 3 times per day … Vitamin C, Magnesium, Turmeric Curcumin, Vitamin D, Vitamin B-12, Omega 3 Fish Oil, Cordyceps, Ashwaganda, Lithium Synergy, 5-HTP, GABA, Cat’s Claw, Burbur Pinella, Resveratrol, L-Glutathione, Chlorella, Real NAD Plus, Feverview, and CoQ10.

4Hydrate … I literally drink about a gallon of water per day (Spring Water or Filtered or Alkaline).

5Avoiding Stress/Conflict … That means I avoid certain people, conversations, debates, arguments, etc. Even on social media. Especially on social media. You can have it. As for me, “Ain’t nobody got time for dat!”

6 Prayer … Every morning and throughout my day I’m constantly calling on God for healing, strength, energy, clarity of mind, peace, etc. Mornings are typically the roughest part of my day, and I often feel like there’s NO WAY I can possibly make it through my work day. Honestly, most people wouldn’t even go to work feeling the way that I do. I cling to Philippians 4:13 … “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.”

7Talk Therapy … I’ve recently talked with two different therapists/counselors who have personally battled Lyme Disease. They’re way further along the road to healing than I am. I also regularly talk with and listen to friends who are battling Lyme Disease. It really helps. Bottling things up and trying to face it on my own was making me feel much worse. Don’t isolate. Don’t bottle up.

8Frequent Breaks … I take extended lunch breaks to rest in my work truck after I eat lunch (a benefit of owning my own company). When I get home from work in the evening, I also lay on the floor for 30-minutes and allow my two dogs (Remi and Ruger) to sniff and lick all over me … then they typically nestle up beside me. I love it and need it.

9Bind and Detox … Several times a week I take Activated Charcoal tablets to bind-up toxins … and I also do hot epsom salt baths … and at least once per week, I go to the local spa for a 30-minute session in the infrared sauna.

10Don’t Overdo It … I push myself, but not too much … I’m learning to listen to my body and know my limits with this disease so I don’t overdo it. Like the other day … I was at work and I really wanted to finish an area that I was painting, but I could feel my brain fog coming on strong with a frontal headache. My lower left abdomen pain also began to increase. I knew right then and there it was time to clean-up, pack-up, and call it a day. My body was saying, “Enough! Time to rest!”

11Keep Learning … I’m constantly reading books, articles, and blogs … or listening to podcasts or audio books … that help me improve/heal physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually! Today I began reading The Healer Within by Holly Chameli. She’s recovered from Chronic Lyme, CFS, and Autuimmune Disease. Her story is inspiring me and giving me hope.

12Have a Yoda … I pay big bucks out of pocket (insurance won’t cover a dime) to see a top Lyme Disease Specialist who listens to me, runs various tests on me, advises me, and prescribes various holistic/naturopathic treatments that help heal me. His name is Greg Lee and he’s with the Lyme Research and Healing Center in Frederick, MD.

13Move … You have to keep physically active. That looks different for all of us depending upon what stage we’re at in the healing journey. If all you can do is walk out to your mailbox and walk back, do it. Then the next week, walk to your neighbor’s mailbox. Do some sort of physical activity and keep increasing it week by week, but don’t overdo it. There will be some days (or weeks) where you’re flaring-up or having a bad herx reaction, and all you need to do is rest/sleep/recover. Dude, I get it. Been there. Done that. Got the T-Shirt!

As I said, this past week was definitely a better week for me, but I realize that tomorrow I could wake-up and experience a major relapse. That’s how it goes sometimes. Nevertheless, I will continue to keep doing these 13 things in my battle to heal.

Battling With You,

Jason

Today my daughter Gabrielle and I took Remi to a local park to play and then we went to Starbucks for a treat. Watching her laugh at Remi while he lapped-up a pupacino was therapeutic.

Jason T. George is not a medical professional. The content of BattlingLyme.com is for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, and treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read, seen, or heard from Jason T. George.

A Better Day for Me!

Nausea and head pressure were messing with me this morning. I took Elle to school, cleaned up, and loaded up the truck for work. I had to go back and paint ceilings and then begin painting the trim … lots of trim (floor trim, chair rail, crown molding, etc.) I thought I’d be done with this job by the end of today. Wishful thinking. This job has been more work than I anticipated. I definitely underbid it. Oh well. Live and learn.

As I focused on painting, the less I focused on my pain, and that actually helped. By 12pm, I needed an extended lunch break to rest my body. My neck and mid-back were killing me. I drove to Chipotle … ate another burrito bowl of white rice, double chicken, and guac. Then I stopped and got a small Starbucks coffee. In the afternoon, I felt pretty good while painting, but by 4pm my body was telling me to stop for the day. I began having some head pressure with brain fog and my left abdomen began to ache. So I cleaned up and went home.

For dinner, I ate some broiled wild caught flounder with green beans and baked french fries. I took my meds, vitamins, and supplements … and now I’m chilling on the couch watching Netflix … a good documentary called The Magic Pill.

Today I found out that my recent stool test came back “normal.” I’m still waiting on the results from my SIBO test. Something has been wrong with my stomach and intestines for months and we can’t figure it out. At times, the pain has been absolutely excruciating.

Overall, it was a better day for me. Thank You, Lord.

Battling with you,

Jason

Painting Ceilings in Major Pain!

Some days I don’t know how I’m going to make it through. Today was one of those days. I woke up around 6am, and immediately I was hit with major nausea. If I remain in bed, I just focus on it. So I get up, use the bathroom, drink a glass of water, and lay on the couch while the coffee brews. As I lay on the couch, the left side of my face begins to twitch. I feel miserable and I have a paint job today and it’s nothing but ceiling painting. That’s some of the hardest painting you can do. It strains your neck and back for hours on end. Oh well, no use in complaining.

The coffee is ready. I pour myself a cup, sip on it slowly, and eat 1/2 of a gluten-free breakfast bar. That’s about all my stomach can tolerate. For my morning meditation … I read Psalm 103, write some notes in my journal, and spend some time in prayer. Here’s what I wrote in my journal …

“Abba, I’m claiming Psalm 103 where You say … You forgive all my iniquity – You heal all my diseases – You redeem my life from the pit – You crown me with steadfast love and mercy – You satisfy me with good – You renew my youth like the eagles.”

In my journal, I question God, “Why would You have such words in Scripture if they are not there to claim when your children are in the pit of pain and despair?”

I go on and read Psalm 103:13 … As a father shows compassion to his children, so the Lord shows compassion to those who fear Him. For He knows our frame. He remembers that we are dust.

I beg God to fulfill this verse in my life, and then tell Him, “Today I have a paint job here in the neighborhood. I need Your help, Lord. I can’t do this without You. That’s how sick I’ve felt lately. I don’t have the strength to do this on my own. You have strengthened me before and I trust You will do it again. In Jesus mighty name, amen.”

After that, I get up, get dressed for work, load up the truck, and kiss my wife goodbye. I stop by the paint store to pick up some supplies. I’m still nauseous and having bad left abdomen pain. My anxiety is also messing with me. I try not to focus on it. I get to the job by 8:30am. I’m in major pain all morning as I work. MAJOR PAIN! Again, I want to go to the E.R. and get help, but it’s pointless so I get it out of my mind. “This will pass Jason. Hang in there.”

At 11:30am, I take a break for lunch and head to Chipotle. I order a burrito bowl … just white rice, double chicken, and some guac. My stomach typically does okay with those three items. I still feel nauseous with left abdomen pain, major fatigue, and malaise. After eating, I put my seat back in my work truck and rest for about 20 minutes. I end up texting with one of my friends who is battling brain cancer.

I’m back on the job by 1pm. Now my upper stomach aches. It feels bloated like it needs to release some gas. 20 minutes later I finally begin belching and it releases the pressure. “Why is my stomach so jacked up the last few months?” I drunk a little bit of Starbucks coffee as I continued painting the ceilings. Thankfully, today I didn’t really deal with one of my nasty headaches that brings on horrible brain fog. As the afternoon progressed, my symptoms began to reduce. Thank God! I worked til 4:30pm and then packed up. I have to be careful not to overdo it.

I came home, put my equipment away, and just laid on the floor with the dogs for 30-minutes. They help me feel relaxed. My neck and mid-back are extremely sore. I took some meds and supplements to help me … Gaba, Turmeric, Magnesium, Vitamin C, Omega 3 Oil, Vitamin D, 5-HTP, Selenium, 6 drops of Cats Claw in water, and .25mg of Clonazepam. I eat some dinner with the family, get cleaned up, and then relax on the couch with a small cup of fresh coffee. I send a contract to a customer and deposit a check online.

Now I’m typing this blog. I feel decent right now. Definitely much much better than I was this morning. I’m extremely grateful for the respite. I’m also extremely grateful for what I was able to accomplish at work today. At times, the pain felt unbearable, but God helped me through.

I did it!

Thank You, Lord.

So that’s the latest with me. Still battling. One day at a time.

Time to relax and watch some TV. Tomorrow I’m back at it … more ceilings to paint.

Battling with you,

Jason

Jason T. George is not a medical professional. The content of BattlingLyme.com is for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, and treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read, seen, or heard from Jason T. George.

Right Now I’m NOT Happy, NOT Rejoicing, and NOT Giving Thanks!

It’s worse than usual this week, and I’m not sure why.

I can do very little physical work and I hate that. I want to be working my job, going to the gym, trail running, working in my yard … FREGGIN’ DOING LIFE! But lately, when I physically exert myself, excruciating pain shoots through my lower left abdomen up into my left rib cage and sometimes up into my left chest. It’s so bad that it floors me. I mean I literally have to lay on the floor until it subsides. After multiple tests, doctors have no answer as to why this is happening.

The abdomen pain frequently triggers what I call “the forehead headaches.” These are not typical tension or migraine headaches. They’re different. They bring on a wicked feeling of confusion, disorientation, and weakness. It’s not mere “brain fog.” It’s much worse than that. It feels like my brain is going into shut-down mode and disconnecting from my body. When it hits, there’s nothing I can do to stop it. I just have to wait it out.

Then (if all that were not enough), my anxiety can suddenly spike for no apparent reason. It’s so intense that I feel like I’m going to jump out of my skin. I don’t like calling it an “anxiety attack” or “panic attack” because I’m actually not being attacked. What’s really happening is my brain is unconsciously trying to protect me from what’s going on inside of my body so it triggers my nervous system to go into “fight or flight” mode. I do my best to passively accept it. If you try to escape it or fight it or if you freak-out over it, you’ll only fuel it. I’ve learned that passively accepting it and giving it time to pass is the best thing to do to activate my parasympathetic nervous system to trigger “the relaxation response.” One of the many things that late-stage Lyme Disease jacks-up is your nervous system and/or your vagus nerve.

When I have these “episodes” (with the abdomen and rib pain with the forehead headaches with the anxiety spikes) … it’s extremely difficult for me to talk because I feel so mentally off, disoriented, and not even present. I literally have to talk softly and slowly, and even that takes incredible effort. It’s so weird and frustrating. When all of it is hitting at once, it actually hurts my brain to talk. I know that must sound strange to most people.

(feeling some confusion right now)

I’m not sure if these “episodes” are just a bad herx reaction to the homeopathic/herbal medicines that I’m taking. I think that’s what’s going on and I actually hope that’s what’s going on, because if they’re herx reactions then that means the bad stuff is dying inside of me and I just need to do a better job of binding and detoxing all of it.

This Thursday, I go back to see my Lyme Specialist in Frederick, MD (Greg Lee). I’m hoping he can help me understand what’s going on with these “episodes” and help eliminate or at least reduce them. I remember what he and another Lyme Specialist told me during my first visit, “This isn’t a drive thru, Jason. It takes time to recover … and I hope you’re not a Girl Scout.” I was like, “Yeah, I’m tough. I’m in it for the long haul. I’ll be okay.”

Well, I’m not okay. I haven’t been “okay” for quite some time, but I just kept trying to “cowboy up.” ENOUGH! Today I actually met with a therapist to talk about what I’m going through because I’ve finally come to the point where I admit that I can’t handle this on my own. I’m not smart enough or strong enough. Its just too much for me to try and go solo. Did you know that the leading cause of death among Lyme sufferers is suicide? Don’t worry … NO, I’m not having suicidal thoughts. I’m just admitting that I need help … not only physically, but also mentally … and I sincerely don’t give a rip what people think or say about me seeing a therapist for all of this.

Bottling-up my negative thoughts, fears, questions, and emotions is NOT healthy. It’s toxic, and that’s what most men do, and in my opinion that’s the reason why more men than women are alcoholics, drug addicts, abusers, and suicidal. Trying to be “an army of one” with chronic physical and mental suffering is not only foolish … it’s EXTREMELY dangerous! So I did some research and found a therapist to work with, and guess what? She’s also fought through Lyme Disease herself. Dude, she gets it! She can finish my sentences!

I think our first session went pretty well. It was basically just a time to get to know each other, and I got some things out that I needed to.

This evening as I type this … I’m NOT happy … I’m NOT rejoicing … and I’m NOT giving thanks. I’m hurting, and I’m trying to stabilize physically and mentally. Today I’ve been so tempted to go to back to the ER, but I know it will just be more of the same tests with the same results with the same clueless doctors with another medical bill to pay. No thank you.

(long 10-minute pause)

Writing this blog post has been kind of therapeutic. It’s actually helping to trigger the relaxation response. Finally the waves are beginning to die down. I wanted to write while I was in the midst of an “episode” … when everything feels so negative, frustrating, overwhelming, and hopeless. Just keeping it real people.

Man, I’ve said it before, but it’s worth saying again … this disease is without a doubt the hardest thing I’ve ever been through in my entire life (and if you know me, then you know I’ve been through some serious $#%@ over the last 44 years … physically, mentally, and emotionally)! Those of you who are fellow Lyme Warriors, you know exactly what I’m talking about with how hard it is. Some of you reading this will roll your eyes at what I’m about to say, but I’ve had fellow Lyme Warriors tell me that giving birth, passing kidney stones, battling cancer, and even being shot (he was a police officer) … were nothing in comparison to battling late-stage Lyme Disease. Don’t misunderstand me … I’m not in anyway trying to minimize those other struggles. I’m just trying to help people understand that this disease is much worse than most people realize (including medical professionals).

If you’ve never seen the documentary Under Our Skin, you should check it out.

Under Our Skin from DecimalZero on Vimeo.

I would appreciate your prayers during this agonizing part of the climb. I’m definitely praying for many of you who’ve shared your pain and suffering with me.

My email is Jason@Narrowtrail.com

Don’t give up.

Reach out and get help if you need it (physically, mentally, emotionally, whatever).

You’re not weak for doing that.

Battling with you,

Jason

Jason T. George is not a medical professional. The content of BattlingLyme.com is for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, and treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read, seen, or heard from Jason T. George.

“Give Thanks in All Circumstances” … Are you serious God?

God commands us to give thanks in all circumstances1 Thess. 5:18 … and that means even when life sucks. Man, that’s easier said than done, especially when you’re new to pain, suffering, loss, and disappointment. When life sucks, giving thanks can “feel” utterly impossible, but it’s not. It just “feels” that way, and you can’t trust your feelings. Let me repeat what I stated in one of my recent blog posts (Life’s Not Fair!) …

NO MATTER WHAT IS HAPPENING TO US, WE STILL HAVE THE POWER TO CHOOSE HOW WE RESPOND!

When life sucks, the easy and natural response is to wallow, whine, complain, envy, worry, and get bitter. The difficult and courageous response is to pause and give thanks for the many good things in your life. You have the power to choose your response … and giving thanks is the response that God wants from us … and He has good reasons for that which I’ll explain shortly.

It’s no coincidence that God chose the Apostle Paul to be the man to write those specific words of Scripture … “Give thanks in all circumstances.” God did not choose a man who was enjoying a pain and problem free life. Far from it, God purposefully chose a man who deeply understood pain, suffering, illness, injury, loss, betrayal, loneliness, frustration, anger, anxiety, depression, and despair (far more than any of us). In 2 Corinthians chapter 11, we learn that the Apostle Paul endured multiple imprisonments, countless beatings, and was often near death. Five times at the hands of the Jewish religious leaders, he received a beating of 39 lashes. Three times he was beaten with rods. One time a mob stoned him and left him for dead. Three times he was shipwrecked at sea, and after one of those shipwrecks, he actually spent an entire night and day adrift in the sea. On his cross-country missionary journeys, he was often in danger from river crossings, from the wilderness, from robbers, from fake Christians, and even from his own people. He also mentioned that he constantly endured toil and hardship that involved many sleepless nights and was often without food and water which of course led to many days and nights of hunger and thirst. On top of all of that, he was constantly exposed to the brutal elements of cold weather on his missionary journeys and also during his imprisonments in nasty dungeons. Internally, he also battled anxiety. He mentions all of this in 2 Corinthians chapter 11. This is the man that God intentionally chose to tell all of us to “Give thanks in all circumstances.”

Paul is not the type of guy we we can look at and say, “Who do you think you are telling me to give thanks in all circumstances? You have no idea what it’s like to go through __________________.” You can fill in the blank, but no doubt … whatever it is, Paul gets it. He knows all about pain and suffering and life not being fair.

Over the past two weeks, I keep thinking about what it means to give thanks in “all circumstances.” I can’t get those two words out of my mind … “all circumstances.” At times, I’ve been angry over those two words and I’m like, “Really God? You want me to give thanks in ‘all circumstances?’ Do you not see what I’ve been going through for the past few years? This suffering that I’ve continually asked You to deliver me from, but You haven’t? Is this some kind of cruel joke that You play on us? It just doesn’t make sense! Why would You tell me to give thanks when you don’t answer my prayers and You continue to allow life to suck?”

Over the last two decades of reading and studying Scripture, I’ve noticed that there are actually quite a few things that God commands us to do that often don’t make sense to us, but I’m learning that this is where REAL FAITH comes in. When we trust and obey God even when it doesn’t make sense to us … even when it’s the complete opposite of what we naturally “feel” like doing … THAT’S REAL FAITH. So with this particular command of giving thanks in all circumstances, I’ve been daily trying to trust and obey Him, and here’s what I’ve been discovering …

When we make a practice of giving thanks, we actually experience incredible personal benefits (especially during those times when life really sucks). Not only does giving thanks glorify God, but it’s scientifically proven to personally benefit us: mentally, emotionally, and even physically. Scientific research has revealed that the practice of gratitude literally rewires our brains to give us a happier mood. In 2005, research was done by Psychologists Dr. Robert Emmons of the University of California and Dr. Michael McCullough of the University of Miami … and they found that the participants in their study who kept a daily journal of things that happened throughout their week that they were thankful for ended up feeling more positive about their lives than those who didn’t continually recognize and write down what they were thankful for.

Other scientific studies have shown that routinely giving thanks also improves our sleep quality and reduces stress, anxiety, and depression. There’s also research/evidence that shows that people who routinely gives thanks have less fatigue, less inflammation, and they even reduce their risk of heart failure (even for those who are more susceptible to that particular condition). I also found it super fascinating that one of the neuro-chemicals associated with the practice of giving thanks is dopamine (the pleasure chemical). – Source Link

After reading about all of this, it began making sense to me why God commands His children to give thanks in all circumstances. He’s not trying to play a cruel joke on us. On the contrary, as our Creator/Designer, He’s known all along how much giving thanks will personally benefit us: mentally, emotionally, and physically … especially during those times when life really sucks … and He wants us to experience all of those personal benefits because He’s a good Father who always wants what’s best for His children.

So here I am, realizing (once again) that even when God’s commands don’t gel with “common sense” or with what I naturally “feel” like doing … I still need to trust and obey Him because I don’t know everything that He knows … especially when it comes to the intricate connection and function of my brain, biology, thoughts, beliefs, self-talk, and conscious choices.

Stop and consider this … with these scientific studies regarding routinely giving thanks … science has unintentionally validated that God’s Word (the Bible) is not some outdated book that has no application for modern man’s complex mental, emotional, physical, and relational “issues.” God actually knows what He’s talking about. Ha. Go figure.

Listen, I know how difficult it can be to give thanks when life really sucks. I know it’s the last thing that you naturally “feel” like doing, but it doesn’t matter. You still have the power to choose your response regardless of what is happening to you in any given moment or situation. I did it last night as I was trying to fall asleep. For dinner, I ate something I shouldn’t have eaten, and severe stomach pains had me tossing and turning as I tried to fall asleep. In that moment, I decided to take control of my thoughts and I began thanking God for all sorts of various things (even my painful health issues). Did it miraculously and instantaneously heal me of my Lyme Disease? No, but within a few minutes I actually fell asleep. There was no more tossing and turning with frustration. Giving thanks obviously triggered the relaxation response in my body which allowed me to fall asleep more quickly.

God is showing me that regardless of what sucks in my life, there are still numerous things to be thankful for. It all comes down to my perspective and what I choose to focus on. Most people in this world choose to focus on the negative, the pain, the suffering, the loss, the symptoms, the suck, or what they don’t have that others do have (envy). That has often been me. I still struggle with it, but I’m battling to be different … to be better than that.

I encourage you to do what I’ve been doing … take time daily to write down what you’re thankful for in a journal. The next day, write down more things that you’re thankful for. Do it and keep doing it until it begins to transform you.

Another way I’m giving thanks is to take time to regularly thank the people who’ve been a blessing in my life. You need to do the same. Appreciate them. Write them a letter. Shoot them a text message. Post on their Facebook wall. Or tell them in person. Don’t wait to thank them at their funeral. That’s selfish! Tell them now while there’s still time. You have no idea how much they might need that word of encouragement in that moment (and of course, thanking them will also benefit you too … you’ll get yourself a fresh hit of dopamine).

I really encourage you to join with me in making a habit of giving thanks (REGARDLESS of your situation or circumstances). I’m daily battling to do this, and it’s not easy for me, but here’s something interesting that I’m discovering … when I continually focus on my symptoms and pain … I feel worse and my healing does not progress like I need it to. Also, if I continually look at social media and focus on other people who seem to be living a better, healthier, and happier life than me … I also feel worse and my healing does not progress like I need it to. The mind/body connection in regards to healing is legit and amazing. I’m just starting to tap into this realm of healing. Yes I still believe in going to doctors and taking your meds, vitamins, supplements … but I’m beginning to realize how much my thoughts, beliefs, attitude, words, and actions can either help or hinder my healing (and pain levels). I’ve been reading a fascinating book on this subject called Mind Over Medicine by Dr. Lissa Rankin – Amazon Link Here. I’m sure I’ll write about it in the future.

I’ll wrap this up by showing you the many blessings I wrote in my personal journal the night of Thanksgiving

  • Had a good night’s sleep last night.
  • Was able to enjoy a little coffee and read Scripture this morning.
  • Was able to eat some normal Thanksgiving food and it didn’t cause major issues.
  • Got to watch a movie with my wife.
  • Got to play a game of chess with my son and had no cognitive issues.
  • Got to play with the dogs.
  • Got to talk to my brother and sister on the phone and wish them a Happy Thanksgiving.
  • Got to talk to a few friends and family via text.
  • Was able to do some stretching and go for a two-mile walk in the neighborhood.
  • I have medicine, vitamins, and supplements to help me with my “issues.”
  • I have warm clothes and a warm house.
  • I have clean filtered water to drink.
  • My rib and abdominal pain were not as bad today.
  • I’ve been experiencing less headaches the last few weeks.
  • My anxiety has not been flaring up this week.
  • My wife and kids are healthy.
  • All the bills are paid on time.
  • I was able to speak at a recent youth event.
  • I’m forgiven of all of my sins.
  • Heaven is my home.
  • I’m eternally secure in God’s hands.

Typically, that’s not the type of stuff I write in my journal. Typically (for the last few years), I list out all of my recent symptoms, problems, issues, etc. Yes, it’s important to track your symptoms when you’re battling a chronic illness, but if that’s all you’re doing with your journal … it can often leave you frustrated, discouraged, anxious, etc. So now when I write in my journal, I still track my symptoms, but I also reserve a separate page to write out what I’m thankful for on that day. I now consider this part of my recovery just as much as I do taking meds, vitamins, herbal supplements, etc. Call me cooky if you want, but I think the scientific research says I’m a wise man if I do this.

Anyway, that’s it for now. Hope this blog post in some way encourages and motivates those of you who are also in the midst of enduring some serious pain and suffering. You’re not alone. I know you may feel very weak and scared right now, but you’re a WARRIOR! It hasn’t beaten you! You’re still alive! You’re still breathing! You got out of bed this morning to face another day even with the pain and suffering … just like I did!

Good job.

Keep it up.

One day at a time.

That’s how we roll!

Battling with you,

Jason

Jason T. George is not a medical professional. The content of BattlingLyme.com is for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, and treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read, seen, or heard from Jason T. George.

Don’t Take the Little Things for Granted!

I think the last few months (and especially the last few weeks) have been the hardest I’ve endured thus far in this battle with Lyme Disease, co-infections, chronic pain, and nagging anxiety. In June of this year (2019), I had two more tick bites, and even though I caught them and removed them right away, I believe they made my health much worse than it already was. Since then, my pain has intensified and been relentless (especially the last week) … just day after day of nausea, abdominal pain, rib pain, back pain, head pain, face pain, chest pain, difficulty comprehending and articulating, memory problems, anxiety attacks, brain inflammation, air hunger, weakness, malaise/yuck feeling, etc.

As I said, it’s especially been hard over the last week. I’m not sure if the new homeopathic meds I’m taking are causing me to have a horrible herxheimer reaction or what. With these new homeopathic meds, I’ve been told that it often gets worse before it gets better because they’re doing a lot of killing of the Lyme and co-infections. That means there are a lot of toxins in your body that have to be removed. If you don’t detox constantly, you will feel like death is at your door. No, I’m not being overly dramatic. This is without question the hardest trial I’ve ever been through and I’ve been through some painful $#%& throughout my life.

As tough as I am, I’m literally struggling to make it through each workday. I’ll be painting a house and by 11am my left abdomen, ribs, and back are in so much pain that I have to stop and take an extended lunch break. At times, it literally feels like my left ribs are broken. Thank God I own my own company or I’d be fired. During my break, I’ll eat a little food, and then I put my seat back in my truck and try to get into a deep relaxed state, hoping to activate my parasympathetic nervous system. Sometimes I lay there and listen to a podcast that will help me learn more about my illness and how to deal with it better … or sometimes I’ll recite Scripture, pray, or just repeatedly speak positive/hopeful words of healing to myself. If I’m working close to home, I’ll actually come home for lunch, eat a little, and then lay on my living room floor for 30 minutes and pray. My prayers are typically something like this, “Oh Jesus, please help me to be able to finish the work day. Give me the strength I need. I can’t do this without You.” Then it’s back to work. Unfortunately, I can’t work a full 8-hour day at this stage in my healing journey. I’m typically packing up my gear to come home by 2 or 3pm because the pain has escalated so bad that I’ll easily get sloppy with my painting and I can’t do that.

When I come home, my typical routine is to take a hot epsom salt bath for 20 minutes then quickly rinse off in the shower with cold water. After that, I try to eat a little dinner and then I usually rest on the couch with a castor oil rag and a heating pad over my abdomen and ribs (it actually brings the pain down a few notches). If I have a bad headache, I take a Gabapentin and apply an essential oil mix upon my forehead, temples, neck, and behind my ears to try and bring the head pain down a few notches. If my brain feels foggy and inflamed, I’ll drink a glass of water with 20 drops of Burbur-Pinella. I’ve also been experimenting with a new CBD oil (too early to tell if it helps). The other night I was also dry brushing (it’s another form of detoxing … I was really hurting that night).

My G.I. doc has not given me a definitive cause as to why I’m dealing with daily left-sided abdominal pain and digestive issues. This left-sided abdominal pain began back in September of this year (2019). It’s had me in the ER two different times. He (the G.I. doc) said he’s not worried about it because all of the major tests came back “normal.” The only out of the ordinary thing he saw was a minuscule amount of blood in my stool, but he said he wasn’t concerned about that because it’s probably a hemorrhoid. I was like, “Okay? So then what’s causing this horrible chronic pain in my left abdomen and why is my digestion so jacked up?” He just said it could take six months to clear up and gave me a med that’s supposed to help with the abdomen pain. I don’t think it helps at all.

Based on what I’ve seen coming out of me over the last 3 months, I think I’m dealing with some sort of parasitic infection or intestinal candida (I’ll spare you the details and pics). I’ve treated for parasites two different times over the last three months, but I’ve heard that the little bastards are hard to kill. I’ve even been doing coffee enemas. I know. I know. You’re probably like, “What the heck? You put coffee up your butt?” That was my response to the idea of coffee enemas until I got super desperate and did the research. Then I saw the many health benefits … link here to learn.

So, to wrap this up … at this stage in my healing journey, I’m still in serious pain (daily), but every now and then I get some moments of relief and they’re freggin WONDERFUL! For instances, yesterday during my lunch break, I sat in my truck with the seat back and read a chapter of a new book (Mind Over Medicine by Dr. Lissa Rankin), and in that moment … I had very minimal pain, my heart and mind were calm, and my comprehension wasn’t a struggle. I thanked God for it. Yesterday, I also did a lite 30-minute ride on our peloton bike. In that moment, there was also minimal pain and I worked up a good sweat to detox. I thanked God for it. Later in the day, after my infrared sauna session (another way I detox), I was driving home and I literally felt my pain symptoms come down a few notches to the point where I could stop and get a hot cup of Starbucks coffee and enjoy a few sips (unfortunately, I can no longer finish a full cup of coffee because of what it does to my stomach and that’s been super frustrating because coffee is one of my loves). Anyway, I thanked God for that moment too.

Something I’m learning … When we’re healthy, we take the little things for granted, and then we enter the land of chronic pain/illness and find that those “little things” aren’t little. They’re HUGE! They’re the things that keep you going when life SUCKS! So don’t take the seemingly little things for granted. Treasure them and thank God for them because tomorrow they could be taken from you.

So that’s the latest with me you guys. Thanks for reading. Hope in some way you found some encouragement and motivation for your own battle. You’re not alone.

Battling with you,

Jason

Jason T. George is not a medical professional. The content of BattlingLyme.com is for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, and treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read, seen, or heard from Jason T. George.